Rehabilitation Topics

'The Greenest Building': Sustainability and Economics in Building Reuse

'The Greenest Building': Sustainability and Economics in Building Reuse

This St. Paddy’s week, America’s urban areas are crawling with green-clad revelers drinking green-colored beverages. No doubt that many of these merry-makers will be patronizing pubs in historic buildings and main streets that have benefited from historic preservation efforts. They may not be painted green for the occasion (although there may be a few), but these buildings are often considered ‘the greenest buildings,’ a term coined by American architect and sustainability expert Carl Elefante (FAIA, LEED AP) when he declared, “The greenest building is the one that is already built.”

Commercial Business District Office Towers Can Benefit From Historic Tax Credits

Since industrialization, urban centers across the country have been building up. Early multi-story masonry buildings gave way to glass and steel skyscrapers to create the skylines that have become iconic for many cities. In the 1920s and 1930s, technology and design collided to create the International Style of building that became the prevalent blueprint for modern construction for many decades.

But what is to be done about the millions of square feet that have been left vacant and obsolete when businesses abandon these towers for new facilities or more convenient locations?

Veteran and Military Properties Rehabbed Using Historic Tax Credits

Just as the valiant men and women who are honored this week for Veteran’s Day, there are many retired military properties that have been honored through preservation and reuse. MHA has had the privilege of being consultants on a few.

Functionally-Related Complexes and the NPS

A developer taking on a project involving a group of buildings that served together historically is likely to visit an arcane corner of NPS world called the functionally-related complex policy. Military bases, hospital complexes, industrial complexes, and many other groups of buildings all come under the umbrella of what NPS regulations define as a single resource AND if a single developer or related developers takes on a phased project involving two or more buildings in the group, then the project will be required to file a single Part 1, 2 and 3 application, and will not receive a Part 3 approval until all phases are complete.